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Are you experiencing any of these life-threatening signs?

Since you are having health complications, please select all that apply:



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Covid Status

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Which of these symptoms are you experiencing?

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You should contact your doctor or emergency services and get treatment immediately, your symptoms could be life threatening.

Please self isolate by staying at home, unless your symptoms become more severe and you need medical attention.

The symptoms you report have commonly been observed in people with COVID-19 infection.

You do not appear to have any medical conditions that are currently thought to put individuals at higher risk of severe COVID-19 illness. If you are still worried about your condition, consider calling your doctor, a nurse advice line or a call center to discuss your concerns, rather than immediately leaving the house to seek testing or treatment.

If you are directed to leave your house to go to the doctor, urgent care center, or emergency room, you should wear a mask or other covering over your face and nose to minimize your chances of infecting others.

You do not appear to have symptoms indicative of COVID-19. If new symptoms should appear or current symptoms worsen please return to this tool and re-assess.

  • Stay home if you can, unless you need medical care.
  • Avoid close contact with other people.
  • Wash your hands (for at least 20 seconds) or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Keep your hands away from your face.
  • Wear a mask or cloth face cover in public.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes.
  • Throw used tissues away as you use them.
  • Clean surfaces regularly. Use products that can kill harmful germs and bacteria.

The virus can go from person to person when people are in close contact. Close contact means closer than 6 feet (2 meters) apart.

It can go from person to person in the air when someone who has the virus coughs or sneezes. It can go from person to person when someone who has the virus touches a surface that other people touch.

Someone with no symptoms may still have the virus and can spread it to other people.

The most common symptoms are fever, a new or worsening cough, and new trouble breathing. Less common symptoms: being very tired, body aches, diarrhea, headache, sore throat, losing your sense of taste or smell.

If you work in a hospital, medical office, nursing home or in any health care capacity, contact your health provider and employer immediately if you develop any symptoms of illness. You should not work sick.

A medical test can tell if you have the COVID-19 virus. However, it is not yet available everywhere.

To find out if testing is available in your area, and a good idea for you, call your doctor or state/region public health line.

For non-emergency health questions please seek help in this order:

  1. Call 911 if this is a life-threatening emergency
  2. Call your doctor or healthcare provider
  3. Call the state hotline for your state
  4. If they are not available, call the CDC at 1-800-232-4636
  5. Visit your state's Covid Resource Website

Avoid contact with older adults and anyone with serious underlying medical conditions. Wear a face mask to prevent spreading the illness to others.

Wash your hands (for at least 20 seconds) or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Cover your coughs and sneezes.

Throw used tissues away as you use them.

Speak with your doctor for guidance about testing, alerting the health department, and for when it is safe to leave your home and be around others.

If you work in a hospital, medical office, nursing home or in any health care capacity, contact your health provider and notify your occupational health office or employer. You should not work sick.